Charity Review

Issued: January 2017 Expires: January 2019

Recipe for Success Foundation

Accredited Charity
Meets Standards
 
(713) 520-0443 PO Box 56405, Houston TX 77256-6405 www.recipe4success.org/
  1. Conclusions
  2. Purpose
  3. Programs
  4. Governance & Staff
  5. Fund Raising
  6. Tax Status
  7. Financial
Conclusions

Recipe for Success Foundation meets the 20 Standards for Charity Accountability.

Purpose

The Recipe for Success Foundation is formed for charitable purposes to combat the epidemic of childhood obesity and encourage long term health by altering the way our children understand, appreciate and eat their food, and by educating and mobilizing the community to provide healthier diets for children. 

Incorporated: 2005 in TX

Also Known As: Recipe for Success

Programs

The Foundation’s vision is to establish a national model that promotes healthy eating as the norm and creates a culture where nutritious food is shared, appreciated, and celebrated.  The Foundation provides services through Hands-on Cooking & Gardening, School Contests, Healthy Community Calls to Action, Healthy Food Access, and Publishing initiatives.  Programs delivered through each initiative are as follows:

HANDS ON COOKING & GARDENING

Seed-to-Plate Nutrition Education™ is the Foundation’s signature, hands-on curriculum, for 4-12 year old students developed with help from professional chefs, gardeners, nutritionists and teachers.  The curriculum has been codified and extensively tested to produce a comprehensive online S2P Instructor Guide with hundreds of class content options designed to relate to harvest schedules, grade-level core learning objectives and a variety of delivery schedules and rotations.  The largest program of its kind, Seed-to-Plate Nutrition Education™ has reached over 30,000 children to date with an integrated schedule of classes in the garden and kitchen.   Significant improvements in nutrition knowledge, increases in consumption of fruits and vegetables, and a greater willingness to try new fruits and vegetables have all been documented.   Four Showcase Schools are operated in Houston under the direct management of Recipe for Success Foundation staff, fee for service programs are also available to Houston schools and community sites.  This program has reached national scale through development of Affiliate Partnerships, underpinned by rigorous online instructor training; certification and ongoing support to ensure results are consistent with historic achievements. Affiliate Partnerships are briskly expanding to every school district in the Houston area, and to schools from coast to coast.

Eat This! Summer Camp™ prepares kids to become savvy food consumers. In programs ranging from 36 - 120 hours, 8-15 year olds students cook, garden and learn how food producers develop and market products to the American consumer. Their experience culminates with a project to turn the bounty of their summer garden into a healthy marketable prepared product. This program is offered at RecipeHouse annually each summer, and also can be adapted for after-school or embedded into the school day to extend the lesson into a year-round opportunity through Seed-to-Plate Nutrition Education™ fee for service and Affiliate Partnership programs.
RecipeHouse is a fresh space developed for cooking classes, children’s camps, seminars, team building opportunities and special events. RecipeHouse also plays host to exclusive dinners presented by members of the Foundation’s Chefs Advisory Board, which includes high profile culinary stars from Houston and around the country.

SCHOOL CONTESTS
My Favorite Holiday Food Annual Story Writing Contest focuses kids on the importance of building family food traditions, while at the same time giving them practice using writing skills measured by state tests. Fourth grade students write about their favorite family holiday food brought alive with the recipe and preparation, enhanced by colorful descriptions of how it looks, smells, and tastes. Students explain how the recipe became a family tradition and often provide colorful cultural history and family anecdotes. Teachers use the contest as a classroom tool to practice creative writing devices, and students spend more time with their families and gain a deeper understanding and pride in their traditions. The grand prize winner, chosen from among all school winners by Houston’s Poet Laureate, Gwen Zepeda, gets to be Chef for a day with Chef Neil Cox at the Houstonian.

VegOut! Principal's & Faculty Challenge places teachers and role models in the spotlight. The contest dares participating faculty and staff to eat more fruits and vegetables and report their daily progress to their students who hold them accountable and urge them to stay on track to win. The role reversal excites everyone involved, initiates a campus-wide focus on healthy eating, and strengthens relationships between the students and faculty by promoting teamwork and solidarity. Winners are acknowledged on each campus and the Principal with the highest percentage of faculty and students participating earns a grand-prize.

HEALTHY COMMUNITY CALL TO ACTION
VegOut! 30-Day Challenge supports efforts for families and individuals to eat healthier by making it an adventure. Regardless of participant motivation - the fun of competition, the exploration of new food, or a personal focus on healthier eating - the end result is the same: A behavior repeated for 30 days becomes a habit. So, we say “Step up to the plate and pile it with veggies.” VegOut! Is a year-round advocacy promotion supported by a dedicated resource-packed website that culminates every March with a 30 Ways in 30 Days Challenge to eat thirty different vegetables within the month. Each March thousands of kids, adults, employee groups and families participate. They are joined by chefs, celebrities, community leaders, city mayors, athletes and media personalities, who all accept the challenge to eat more veggies.

Garden Haikus for Earth Day Contest in April celebrates National Gardening Month and National Poetry Month as well as Earth Day. The Garden Haiku Contest is meant to inspire Houstonians to think about their gardens as a source for food. The contest is divided into three award-winning categories: Seeds (elementary school students), Sprouts (middle & high school students) and Blooms (college students & post academic entrants). All qualifying entries must be in haiku format and reflect a theme of growing healthy food or our commitment to “making healthy food fun.”

farmers marKIDS days is a free, download-able project-based curriculum with five lesson plans designed to teach children about the business of food by involving them in every aspect of creating a business to sell their home or school garden produce. Students participating in farmers marKIDS will learn about our country’s agribusiness industry and how the food they eat everyday makes it’s way from a farmer’s field to the grocery store. Farmer’s markets are a vibrant sector of food distribution and the perfect framework for children to learn by doing. They are tasked with everything from assessing their products, establishing prices, advertising and promoting their market to managing transactions and calculating profit. This guide contains everything they need including download-able graphics. The Foundation promotes national farmer marKIDS DAYS for a week in October to celebrate and showcase the efforts of young agricultural entrepreneurs.

HEALTHY FOOD ACCESS
Hope Farms will be a fully functional, organic farm, designed to generate significant food crops in the midst of Sunnyside, one of Houston's recognized "food deserts," and provide small business incubation and workforce readiness training for urban youth and US Veterans. The Foundation will help secure and transform unused urban land into productive scale agricultural operations supported by training, mentoring and small business incubation for the new urban farmers in collaboration with established agricultural, business and academic partners.

PUBLISHING
Seed2Plate Press released its first book in September 2012 with 5,000 copies. Eat it! Food Adventures with Marco Polo is a series of adventure stories woven into cookbooks for kids written by Recipe for Success Foundation’s founder, Gracie Cavnar. The tale follows a pint-sized member of Marco Polo’s expedition who discovers wondrous foods in his travels. Volume One: Leaving Home features 29 kid-friendly recipes inspired by the food traditions of medieval Venice and Greece, a pictorial glossary of ingredients, utensils and cooking methods along with a history of flour. Future volumes in this series will explore foods of the time in Persia, China, Southeast Asia, India and Turkey.
Other titles under development: We're Cooking Now! The Cookbook, Celebrating Ten Years of Recipe for Success, The VegOut! Cookbook and Texas Farmtables--showcasing Texas farm families and their favorite recipes.

Governance & Staff

Board Chair/CEO: Ms. Gracie Cavnar, Founder & President

Board Size: 24

Staff: 8

Fund Raising
Method(s) used: Direct Mail Appeals Invitations to Fundraising Events Grant Proposals Internet Appeals Planned Giving Arrangements Cause-Related Marketing

% of Related Contributions on Fundraising: 6.59%

Tax Status

This organization is tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. It is eligible to receive contributions deductible as charitable donations for federal income tax purposes.

Financial

The following information is based on Recipe for Success Foundation's Audited Financial Statements for the fiscal year ending Tuesday, June 30, 2015.

Source of Funds
Contributions $545,431
Program fees $219,318
Special event fees $284,705
Less costs of direct benefits to donors ($61,480)
Interest income $130
Total Income: $988,104
 
Fusion Chart
 
Program Expenses: $774,571
Fundraising Expenses: $50,663
Administrative Expenses: $156,560
Total Expenses: $981,794
 
Income in Excess of Expenses: $6,310
 
Beginning Net Assets: $373,574
Ending Net Assets: $379,884
Total Liabilities: $17,104
Total Assets: $396,988


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Standards Legend

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Standard 1: Board Oversight


Description:

Organizations shall have a board of directors that provides adequate oversight of the charity's operations and its staff. Indication of adequate oversight includes, but is not limited to, regularly scheduled appraisals of the CEO's performance, evidence of disbursement controls such as board approval of the budget, fund raising practices, establishment of a conflict of interest policy, and establishment of accounting procedures sufficient to safeguard charity finances.

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Standard 2: Board Size


Description:

Soliciting organizations shall have a board of directors with a minimum of five voting members.

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Standard 3: Board Meetings


Description:

An organization shall have a minimum of three evenly spaced meetings per year of the full governing body with a majority in attendance, with face-to-face participation. A conference call of the full board can substitute for one of the three meetings of the governing body. For all meetings, alternative modes of participation are acceptable for those with physical disabilities.

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Standard 4: Board Compensation


Description:

Not more than one or 10% (whichever is greater) directly or indirectly compensated person(s) serving as voting member(s) of the board. Compensated members shall not serve as the board's chair or treasurer.

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Standard 5: Conflict of Interest


Description:

No transaction(s) in which any board or staff members have material conflicting interests with the charity resulting from any relationship or business affiliation. Factors that will be considered when concluding whether or not a related party transaction constitutes a conflict of interest and if such a conflict is material, include, but are not limited to: any arm's length procedures established by the charity; the size of the transaction relative to like expenses of the charity; whether the interested party participated in the board vote on the transaction; if competitive bids were sought and whether the transaction is one-time, recurring or ongoing.

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Standard 6: Effectiveness Policy


Description:

Have a board policy of assessing, no less than every two years, the organization's performance and effectiveness and of determining future actions required to achieve its mission.

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Standard 7: Effectiveness Report


Description:

Submit to the organization's governing body, for its approval, a written report that outlines the results of the aforementioned performance and effectiveness assessment and recommendations for future actions.

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Standard 8: Program Expenses


Description:

Spend at least 65% of its total expenses on program activities.

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Standard 9: Fund Raising Expenses


Description:

Spending should be no more than 35% of related contributions on fund raising. Related contributions include donations, legacies, and other gifts received as a result of fund raising efforts.

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Standard 10: Accumulating Funds


Description:

Avoid accumulating funds that could be used for current program activities. To meet this standard, the charity's unrestricted net assets available for use should not be more than three times the size of the past year's expenses or three times the size of the current year's budget, whichever is higher.

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Standard 11: Audit Report


Description:

Make available to all, on request, complete annual financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. When total annual gross income exceeds $500,000, these statements should be audited in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. For charities whose annual gross income is less than $500,000, a review by a certified public accountant is sufficient to meet this standard. For charities whose annual gross income is less than $250,000, an internally produced, complete financial statement is sufficient to meet this standard.

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Standard 12: Detailed Expense Breakdown


Description:

Include in the financial statements a breakdown of expenses (e.g., salaries, travel, postage, etc.) that shows what portion of these expenses was allocated to program, fund raising, and administrative activities. If the charity has more than one major program category, the schedule should provide a breakdown for each category.

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Standard 13: Accurate Expense Reporting


Description:

Accurately report the charity's expenses, including any joint cost allocations, in its financial statements. For example, audited or unaudited statements which inaccurately claim zero fund raising expenses or otherwise understate the amount a charity spends on fund raising, and/or overstate the amount it spends on programs will not meet this standard.

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Standard 14: Budget Plan


Description:

Have a board-approved annual budget for its current fiscal year, outlining projected expenses for major program activities, fund raising, and administration.

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Standard 15: Truthful Materials


Description:

Have solicitations and informational materials, distributed by any means, that are accurate, truthful and not misleading, both in whole and in part. Appeals that omit a clear description of program(s) for which contributions are sought will not meet this standard. A charity should also be able to substantiate that the timing and nature of its expenditures are in accordance with what is stated, expressed, or implied in the charity's solicitations.

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Standard 16: Annual Report


Description:

Have an annual report available to all, on request, that includes: (a) the organization's mission statement, (b) a summary of the past year's program service accomplishments, (c) a roster of the officers and members of the board of directors, (d) financial information that includes (i) total income in the past fiscal year, (ii) expenses in the same program, fund raising and administrative categories as in the financial statements, and (iii) ending net assets.

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Standard 17: Website Disclosures


Description:

Include on any charity websites that solicit contributions, the same information that is recommended for annual reports, as well as the mailing address of the charity and electronic access to its most recent IRS Form 990.

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Standard 18: Donor Privacy


Description:

Address privacy concerns of donors by (a) providing in written appeals, at least annually, a means (e.g., such as a check off box) for both new and continuing donors to inform the charity if they do not want their name and address shared outside the organization, (b) providing a clear, prominent and easily accessible privacy policy on any of its websites that tells visitors (i) what information, if any, is being collected about them by the charity and how this information will be used, (ii) how to contact the charity to review personal information collected and request corrections, (iii) how to inform the charity (e.g., a check off box) that the visitor does not wish his/her personal information to be shared outside the organization, and (iv) what security measures the charity has in place to protect personal information.

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Standard 19: Cause Marketing Disclosures


Description:

Clearly disclose how the charity benefits from the sale of products or services (i.e., cause-related marketing) that state or imply that a charity will benefit from a consumer sale or transaction. Such promotions should disclose, at the point of solicitation: (a) the actual or anticipated portion of the purchase price that will benefit the charity (e.g., 5 cents will be contributed to abc charity for every xyz company product sold), (b) the duration of the campaign (e.g., the month of October), (c) any maximum or guaranteed minimum contribution amount (e.g., up to a maximum of $200,000).

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Standard 20: Complaints


Description:

Respond promptly to and act on complaints brought to its attention by the BBB Wise Giving Alliance and/or local Better Business Bureaus about fund raising practices, privacy policy violations and/or other issues.