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Moving In North Carolina

What Moves Are Regulated?

The North Carolina Utilities Commission regulates intrastate moving within North Carolina. Moves from one town in NC to another are regulated by the commission. Also, the Utilities Commission regulates moves within a city. This means that your move cost will be determined by rates issued by the Utilities Commission. All licensed movers in NC operate from the Maximum Rate Tariff No. 1 published by the NC Utilities Commission.

Moves that are 35 miles and/or less are charged an hourly rate. Moves over 35 miles are charged based on the weight of the shipment and the miles between origin and destination.

The Commission does not have jurisdiction over interstate moves that cross state lines. These moves fall under federal guidelines and require licensing by the federal government.

How Estimates Are Done:

The typical member company of the NCMA would usually like to visit a site to estimate the poundage packing costs of your upcoming move from one town to another. Moves within a city usually do not require a site visit to estimate the hourly charges involved. Each estimator has his own way of conducting an estimate; however the results should be within the same range. After the estimate, a suggestion to the consumer is to ask, "How can I reduce the estimated costs?" The estimator can usually offer helpful hints.

There are three types of estimates offered by movers:

*Non-binding estimates - This is a true estimate. Actual charges will be determined after the services have been completed.
*Binding and guaranteed - This type of estimate is binding on both the mover and the shipper. If the shipper adds any items or services that need to be performed, an addendum will be completed to reflect the new charges.
*Binding and not-to-exceed - This type of estimate states that the price of the estimate is the maximum price for the move. If the actual services performed are less than the estimate, then the actual charges will apply. If the shipper adds any items or services that need to be performed, an addendum will be completed to reflect the new charges.

Helpful Hints:

License - Make sure your mover is licensed and holds a Certificate of Exemption to perform moves within North Carolina. The simplest way is to check their certificate number. All certificate numbers start with NCUC-C#. If you want to be sure that the license is current, you can call the NC Utilities Commission at (919) 733-9277 or visit their website at http://www.ncuc.net/consumer/carriers.pdf. All members of the NC Movers Association hold a valid Certificate of Exemption from the NC Utilities Commission.

Valuation - There are three choices for moving valuation:

*Basic Value Protection - This is available at no charge for the shipper. The mover is only liable for $.60 per pound per article for any lost or damaged article. If you have a 100 lb. TV and it gets damaged, the mover's maximum liability is $.60 x 100 lbs. = $60.
*Depreciated Value Protection - The mover's maximum liability is the greater of $1.25 times the actual weight in pounds of the shipment or a lump sum value that the shipper declares. The mover has the option of paying the shipper the value (less depreciation) of any lost or damaged goods, repairing any damaged goods to the extent necessary to restore them to the same condition as when received, or paying the shipper the cost of the repair.
*Full Value Protection - The mover's maximum liability is the greater of $4.00 times the actual weight in pounds of the shipment or a lump sum value that the shipper declares. The mover has the option of paying the shipper the current day value of the items (no deduction for depreciation), replacing the article with like kind and quality if an item is lost. If an item is damaged, the mover has the option of repairing the item to the extent necessary to restore it the same condition as when received or paying the shipper for the cost of the repair.

On delivery day the driver will give you the completed Bill of Lading and request payment before unloading the truck. Remember, usually cash, certified check, money order, and travelers checks are the only forms of payment that will be accepted. After the delivery is completed, walk through the rooms with the driver and conduct a final inspection of the items. Be sure to note on the inventory sheet any damages before you sign it. However, these notes do not constitute a damage claim. Claims must be in writing on forms provided by the mover. The form must be accompanied by a copy of the paid Bill of Lading. Claims will not be settled until after full payment for the move is rendered to the mover. Claims should be filed with the mover as soon as possible to speed settlement. However, you have 9 months after delivery in which to file the claim.

NOTE: Movers are required to provide you with a copy of the brochure Moving in North Carolina. This brochure should answer your questions about your upcoming move.


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