BBB Business Review

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This business is not BBB accredited.

AKI Tech Support

Phone: (877) 727-3813 604 Onate Place, Santa Fe, NM 87505


BBB Business Reviews may not be reproduced for sales or promotional purposes.


BBB Accreditation

This business is not BBB accredited.

Businesses are under no obligation to seek BBB accreditation, and some businesses are not accredited because they have not sought BBB accreditation.

To be accredited by BBB, a business must apply for accreditation and BBB must determine that the business meets BBB accreditation standards, which include a commitment to make a good faith effort to resolve any consumer complaints. BBB Accredited Businesses must pay a fee for accreditation review/monitoring and for support of BBB services to the public.


Reason for Rating

BBB rating is based on 13 factors. Get the details about the factors considered.

Factors that affect the rating for AKI Tech Support include:

  • Length of time business has been operating
  • Complaint volume filed with BBB for business of this size
  • Response to 1 complaint(s) filed against business
  • Resolution of complaint(s) filed against business


Customer Complaints Summary Read complaint details

1 complaint closed with BBB in last 3 years | 0 closed in last 12 months
Complaint Type Total Closed Complaints
Advertising/Sales Issues 0
Billing/Collection Issues 0
Delivery Issues 0
Guarantee/Warranty Issues 0
Problems with Product/Service 1
Total Closed Complaints 1

Customer Reviews Summary Read customer reviews

0 Customer Reviews on AKI Tech Support
Customer Experience Total Customer Reviews
Positive Experience 0
Neutral Experience 0
Negative Experience 0
Total Customer Reviews 0

Additional Information

BBB file opened: September 05, 2014
Business Category

Computers - Cleaning Services

Alternate Business Names
AKI Techdesk BB Infotech Solutions
Additional Information

BBB Serving New Mexico and Southwest Colorado does not have a physical address for this business and does not know where the business is located.  The Santa Fe address listed in this Business Review is a residential address.  Additionally, the website registration information indicates it is registered to an individual located in India.   BBB Serving New Mexico and Southwest Colorado contacted the business to request a physical address, but the business did not respond.  

Industry Tips

How Tech Support Scams Work
(Courtesy of FTC.GOV)
http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0346-tech-support-scams

Scammers have been peddling bogus security software for years. They set up fake websites, offer free "security" scans, and send alarming messages to try to convince you that your computer is infected. Then, they try to sell you software to fix the problem. At best, the software is worthless or available elsewhere for free. At worst, it could be malware - software designed to give criminals access to your computer and your personal information.

The latest version of the scam begins with a phone call. Scammers can get your name and other basic information from public directories. They might even guess what computer software you’re using. Once they have you on the phone, they often try to gain your trust by pretending to be associated with well-known companies or confusing you with a barrage of technical terms. They may ask you to go to your computer and perform a series of complex tasks. Sometimes, they target legitimate computer files and claim that they are viruses. Their tactics are designed to scare you into believing they can help fix your "problem."

Once they’ve gained your trust, they may:
Ask you to give them remote access to your computer and then make changes to your settings that could leave your computer vulnerable;
Try to enroll you in a worthless computer maintenance or warranty program;
Ask for credit card information so they can bill you for phony services - or services you could get elsewhere for free;
Trick you into installing malware that could steal sensitive data, like user names and passwords;
or direct you to websites and ask you to enter your credit card number and other personal information.
Regardless of the tactics they use, they have one purpose: to make money.

If You Get a Call
If you get a call from someone who claims to be a tech support person, hang up and call the company yourself on a phone number you know to be genuine. A caller who creates a sense of urgency or uses high-pressure tactics is probably a scam artist.
Keep these other tips in mind:
Don’t give control of your computer to a third party who calls you out of the blue.
Do not rely on caller ID alone to authenticate a caller.
Criminals spoof caller ID numbers. They may appear to be calling from a legitimate company or a local number, when they’re not even in the same country as you.
Online search results might not be the best way to find technical support or get a company’s contact information. Scammers sometimes place online ads to convince you to call them. They pay to boost their ranking in search results so their websites and phone numbers appear above those of legitimate companies. If you want tech support, look for a company’s contact information on their software package or on your receipt.
Never provide your credit card or financial information to someone who calls and claims to be from tech support.
If a caller pressures you to buy a computer security product or says there is a subscription fee associated with the call, hang up. If you’re concerned about your computer, call your security software company directly and ask for help.
Never give your password on the phone. No legitimate organization calls you and asks for your password.
Put your phone number on the National Do Not Call Registry, and then report illegal sales calls.

If You've Responded to a Scam
If you think you might have downloaded malware from a scam site or allowed a cyber-criminal to access your computer, don’t panic. Instead:
Get rid of malware. Update or download legitimate security software and scan your computer. Delete anything it identifies as a problem.
Change any passwords that you gave out. If you use these passwords for other accounts, change those accounts, too.
If you paid for bogus services with a credit card, call your credit card provider and ask to reverse the charges. Check your statements for any other charges you didn’t make, and ask to reverse those, too.
If you believe that someone may have accessed your personal or financial information, visit the FTC’s identity theft website. You can minimize your risk of further damage and repair any problems already in place.
File a complaint with BBB on this page and the FTC at http://ftc.gov/complaint

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BBB Customer Review Rating plus BBB Rating Overview


BBB Customer Reviews Rating represents the customers opinions of the business. The Customer Review Rating is based on the number of positive, neutral and negative customer reviews posted that are calculated to produce a score.

Customer Review Experience Value
Positive Review 5 points per review
Neutral Review 3 points per review
Negative Review 1 point per review

BBB letter grades represent the BBB's opinion of the business. The BBB grade is based on BBB file information about the business. In some cases, a business' grade may be lowered if the BBB does not have sufficient information about the business despite BBB requests for that information from the business.
Details

BBB Letter Grade Scale

BBB Rating Value
A+ 5
A 4.66
A- 4.33
B+ 4
B 3.66
B- 3.33
C+ 3
C 2.66
C- 2.33
D+ 2
D 1.66
D- 1.33
F 1
NR -----
Star Rating scale

  Average Score
5 stars 5.00
4.5 stars 4.50-4.99
4 stars 4.00-4.49
3.5 stars 3.50-3.99
3 stars 3.00-3.49
2.5 stars 2.50-2.99
2 stars 2.00-2.49
1.5 stars 1.50-1.99
1 star 0-1.49

BBB Customer Review Rating plus BBB Rating is not a guarantee of a business' reliability or performance, and BBB recommends that consumers consider a business' BBB Rating and Customer Review Rating in addition to all other available information about the business. If the BBB Rating is NR then only Customer Reviews are used for the Star Rating.