BBB Alert: Global Freight and Logistics takes money, doesn’t deliver cars

ID 100203367 150x150 BBB Alert: Global Freight and Logistics takes money, doesn’t deliver carsBBB alerts consumers about Austin-area vehicle transport company

Better Business Bureau, serving Central, Coastal, Southwest Texas and the Permian Basin alerts the public to an Austin-area business that allegedly takes wire payments to transport vehicles and either does not pick them up or doesn’t deliver them to their destination. Complaints to BBB report losses ranging from $650 to more than $13,700. Some also lost a vehicle.

BBB has received 11 complaints about Global Freight and Logistics, also known as GFL, Inc., in the last year. All 11 are unanswered.

Many complaints involve unsuccessful attempts to get Global Freight and Logistics to transport cars between the U.S. and Canada. The website, http://globalfreightandlogistics.com, claims that the company has years of experience in international vehicle shipping. BBB also received a complaint from a subcontractor who stated he transported a vehicle for Global Freight and Logistics and did not receive payment.

Most of the complainants live in Canada, but there are also victims in Texas, Florida, Virginia and Michigan.

The company is owned by Teodoso Ortiz Garza, who sometimes goes by Teodoso Ortiz, Ted Ortiz or Ted Garza.

The company formerly used an address in Snowmass Village, Colorado. Mail sent to that address by BBB was returned undeliverable. The current address is 901 S. Mopac Expressway, West Lake Hills, Texas. Letters sent to that address were not returned.

BBB did not find registration or assumed name filings for Global Freight and Logistics with the state of Texas or Travis County.

BBB confirmed that the company does not have the required license with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR), or the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). For in-state transport, car handlers must be licensed with TDLR. To transport vehicles across state lines, a company must have a license with FMCSA.

Tom Fitzpatrick of St. Petersburg, Florida purchased a collectible car located in Winnipeg, Canada and hired Global Freight and Logistics to transport it to Florida. On Dec. 3, 2012, Fitzpatrick paid Ortiz $4777.80 upfront through a bank transfer, but the company never picked up the car. Ortiz reportedly made several excuses for being late and then quit returning messages.

“The company claimed to be in Colorado,” Fitzpatrick said. “They had a Colorado mailing address. But when I spoke to Ted he claimed to be in Texas. He said he moves 200 cars a month over the border between the U.S. and Canada and said he knows all about duty requirements and taxes. He claims to be a specialist. The payment was for moving, broker’s fee and import duty.”

Carlos Acevedo of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, paid Global Freight and Logistics $2,100 upfront to ship a car from Wisconsin to Canada. The company took the money and never picked up the vehicle.

“It cost $2,100,” Acevedo said. “He [Teodoso Ortiz Garza] just took the money. He wouldn’t accept credit cards and I had to pay in advance. He contacted the seller once, but he didn’t pick up the car. About six weeks after I gave him the money I sort of gave up. I found the company on the Internet. The website says they ship internationally. Not many companies do because of the hassle.”

If you plan to hire an online company to move a vehicle:

  • Check with BBB. Check the company’s BBB Business Review for its rating, complaint history and details regarding those complaints.
  • Check for licensing.  For in-state transport, car handlers must be licensed with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. To transport vehicles across state lines, a company must have a license with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.
  • Avoid companies that demand wire payment only. Scammers often ask victims to wire payments because the money cannot be easily tracked or retrieved in the case of fraud. BBB recommends always using a credit card. If the website turns out to be fraudulent, you can dispute the charge with your credit card company.
  • Do your research. Try searching the company’s name and website along with words like “scam” or “review.” Always try to find a seller’s physical address, not just a P.O. Box and phone number. Research the company’s name and website for additional information.

To check the reliability of a company and find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org.

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About Charles Wood

Charles Wood is an investigator with the Austin Better Business Bureau. He joined BBB after more than 22 years as a newspaper journalist.