Don’t be Fooled: There Isn’t a Problem with Your Netflix Membership

I received an email from “Netflix”  notifying me there’s a “problem with [my] membership.”  Yikes!  As a Netflix junkie, I was momentarily concerned, but my BBB training kicked in fast.  The email wasn’t from Netflix, and there isn’t a problem with my membership.  Rather, the email is a great example of phishing.  Take a look at my notes below, and make sure you check these things whenever you receive an unsolicited email asking for your credit card information.

 


 

 

1.  The email was sent to my work email, but my Netflix account is associated with my personal email address.

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2.  The email didn’t come from Netflix; check out the crazy email address @azure.com.

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3.  Sneaky of them to use the Netflix logo.  This often happens in phishing emails, but don’t be fooled:  graphics are far too easily lifted from legitimate websites.

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4.  “Dear Member” is pretty generic greeting, and with advances in technology, it’s easy to important contact names into emails so they can be personalized.  It’s not a dead giveaway of a phishing email, but it did raise my suspicions.

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5.  They probably can’t “authorize [my] MasterCard,” because I don’t have a MasterCard account.

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6.  It may say “Netflix/Payment,” but if you hover over the link, it’s directing me to a completely different website.

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7.  This phone number isn’t Netflix’s customer service number, but I’m willing to bet if I call it, they’ll answer “Netflix.”  I’ve already decided this is a phishing email, but if I wasn’t sure, I’d go to Netflix’s website, get their customer service number, and call it directly.

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8.  I suppose if they say the email was sent to me by Netflix, it must be … or not!  Remember – phishing emails work best when they look legitimate, so they’ll do what it takes to convince you.  Go with your gut.

9.  Surprisingly, this is Netflix’s real address; again, don’t be fooled by their attempts to make this email look legitimate.  

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About Erika Lehman

I started at BBB|Cincinnati in 2004 as a Co-Op in the Charity Department. Today I am the Director of The Center for Ethics at BBB.